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2 Serious Dog Attacks in B.C.

By Dr. Andrew Jones

These two stories have been very prominent in the news.

Especially shocking was how viscous the attacks were, and the seriousness of the injuries.

gofund me

B.C. man fighting for life in Edmonton hospital after vicious dog attack

A 55-year-old Fort St. John man remains in an Edmonton hospital as doctors fight to save his life and what remains of both arms following a dog attack on Christmas Day.

Fort St. John RCMP said they were called to a trailer home in the northeastern B.C. city by a frantic 51-year-old woman who reported two dogs had entered the home, killed her cat and were mauling her and her partner.

Inside, the officers found a woman suffering from dog bites and a man sitting unresponsive in a chair, appearing to be in shock, while being attacked by the dogs, RCMP Cpl. Dave Tyreman said.

“So at that time, you know, (the officers) tried everything that they could to distract the dogs, to draw their attention away, but they still kept attacking this man,” said Tyreman.

“At that point they felt they had no other alternative but to use lethal force.”

An officer shot one dog, but the other managed to escape with serious injuries, although it was later tracked down and “humanely put down,” Tyreman added.

Officers said they have a good idea who owned the animals but are still trying to figure out why the dogs were loose and what led to the vicious attack.

Family members posted a GoFundMe page for the injured couple, Robin Elgie and Wendy Lee Baker, hoping to raise $10,000 to help with expenses — and surpassed their goal Thursday morning, in one day.

Three people have been injured — one critically — in a vicious dog attack Wednesday in Richmond, B.C.

rottweiler090504
Richmond dog attack leaves woman in critical condition, others injured

Police said one of the injured, the woman in critical condition, was bitten over 100 times by a rottweiler crossbreed.

Police were called to the 9200-block of Williams Road just after 1 p.m. PT after a report that a woman was being mauled by a dog and needed police help.

When officers arrived, they found the woman on the ground, covered in blood and trying to fend off the 35-kilogram dog.

“One of the officers attempted to distract the dog while the other officer tried extracting the wounded victim. The dog was momentarily distracted and returned to re-attack the victim and one of our officers,” said Cpl. Dennis Hwang in a statement.

The officer fired her pistol at the dog and it fled. The 21-year-old woman was taken to hospital with extensive injuries.

“She suffered over 100 bites to her body, a fractured arm, a detached [biceps]. She is currently undergoing surgery and is listed in critical condition,” said Hwang,

“It was a miracle that our officers were unharmed.”

2 others also attacked

Police said the woman was trying to draw the dog away from attacking her three-year-old nephew, the son of her twin sister.

“Her twin sister also sustained serious injuries, namely, multiple lacerations to her body while defending her son from the dog, said Hwang.

The sister was also taken to hospital, said police. The boy was unharmed.

A third person was also attacked when he tried to save the women.

“This one was very extreme,” said animal behaviorist Dr. Rebecca Ledger. “A hundred bites in a single victim – it’s among the worst attacks I’ve heard of.”

According to Richmond legislation, any dog that has injured a person is classified as a dangerous dog. Animal control officers can propose to euthanize the dog, and can do it quickly if the owner agrees. If the owner disagrees then Animal Control must seek an order from the Provincial Court.

Sometimes dangerous dogs can be rehabilitated with training, said Dr. Rebecca Ledger. But this attack was so terrifying it’s unlikely this dog will survive, she said.

“This is such an aggressive attack it wouldn’t be safe to rehabilitate the dog at this point,” she said.

Dr Jones’ Comments

First these are shocking, horrible events- so hard to believe this can happen.

Currently Robin Elgie is doing well in hospital- surgery went well.

The Richmond dog attack victims, Twenty-one-year-old twin sisters Kati and Jessi Mather are recovering now at home- the one girl was bitten over 100 times.

There has been discussion about the Richmond sisters as they are also known as ‘Twins that Toke’

An Instagram account called “Twins that toke THC” shows the Mather sisters drinking, smoking marijuana, and partying. It uses hashtags including #bongbeauties, #stonerbabes and #sisterswhosmoke. THC is the active ingredient in marijuana.

One person moving out of Kati Mather’s Richmond home told CTV news on Saturday the drug use was continuing. He did not want to go on camera, but said the twins would get high on “downers” and yell at the dog and threaten it.

Could they have played a role in altering the dog’s behavior, leading to this attack.

Yes

Then there are the inevitable calls for breed bans- the dogs in question, Pittbulls and a Rottweiler, are the most common breeds responsible for serious dog bite injuries and deaths.

dog bite stats

In discussing this with a colleague, I noted how often the Pitties were some of the best patients, as well as many of the Rotties.. Clearly the environment your dog is raised in has a a huge effect.

My WORST dog bite was from a Chihuahua hanging off my chin..

But NOT all dogs are raised in the ideal environment, and not all dog owners are responsible

Some people should not own pets (or raise kids for that matter)

I agree with the behaviourist that with such aggressive attacks, it is not safe or ethical to rehabilitate such a dog.

Shocking, a reminder that dogs evolved from wolves, and if dogs bred for strength are not raised by responsible people, things can go horribly wrong.

But to put it ALL in perspective, there are 80 MILLION dogs in Canada and the U.S. with relatively few serious dog bite injuries-

You are SO much more likely to injure yourself by falling in the bathroom.

I’d love to hear your thoughts on the matter.

Dr Andrew J

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Topics: Pet Care | 35 Comments »

35 Responses to “2 Serious Dog Attacks in B.C.”


  1. Jennifer Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 6:46 am

    I have a two year old rottweiler and she is one of the sweetest dogs I have owned. She is very gentle with us, plus patient with my two rescues who sometimes annoy her. It depends on how you bring them up. Some people should never own dogs.

  2. Karen Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 6:58 am

    Very sad! I would be very interested to know (and we never will) relative to the statistics that you have posted here, how many of these dogs were abused and mistreated vs. being happy, healthy, well-raised dogs. I think it’s high time that kind of information gets revealed along with what the dog has done. Perhaps it will make some of the idiot people who mistreat dogs wake up and not get a dog! Though it will tragically probably cost this dog it’s life, if it turned on it’s abusive owner it probably had no other choice and, therefore, couldn’t have happened to a better person!!!

  3. Kim Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 7:28 am

    It’s funny you mention the Chihuahua being the worst dog bite Dr. Andrew. I owned and loved a pit bull for 14 1/2 years, and he was the biggest baby in the world. His vet loved him, and all 9 of the vet techs would come in and hug and kiss him each and every time he went in for a visit. One day I heard one of the techs say that they had to get the muzzle out. I asked what was going on, and they said so and so was bringing in their Chihuahua, and it was vicious.

    Pit bulls continue to get a bad rap, and the only reason for it is irresponsible owners, and the fact that their jaws are the most powerful and can do the most damage. Nobody reports the small dog attacks, they cause far less damage, and are forgiven for having the stigma as being ankle biters. Cats bite far more often than dogs, but they don’t make the news as being vicious and needing to be euthanized. I agree, irresponsible owners that should never own an animal to begin with, or have children. They should set up laws that would require background checks in order to do both.

  4. Brandon Van Every Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 7:36 am

    “Officers said they have a good idea who owned the animals but are still trying to figure out why the dogs were loose and what led to the vicious attack.” The victims were not the owners of the dog. At this point without me having done any research, I find comments about the victims taking drugs and yelling at the dogs totally irrelevant. Sounds like vicious dogs roaming the neighborhood and them yelling at the dogs to get them to go away.

    In the USA this kind of problem is solved with a gun, an axe, a stout kitchen knife, and some martial arts training. If you have ever had a big pit bull latched on your own dog’s neck, it will drop your sympathy for such an animal to zero. Kill it quickly in self-defense, no mercy. It’s a pity the victims did not have the skills and equipment to do so. You can’t wait for the police to save you.

  5. Vickie Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 7:37 am

    I am extremely cautious around Pitt Bulls, Rottweilers & Dobermans. I don’t trust them at all. I have been bitten before. The thing here is that there are too many irresponsible people who tend to want these breeds. They don’t properly care for, train or control their animals. I discourage people with kids from getting or keeping one of these dogs. Just too many children have been mauled or killed by the family pet. The owners trusted their dog to be at their best around their kids with disastrous results. That said, I have been bitten by small dogs, as well. If you are going to have a dog in your home, do right by them & train them. Otherwise they are the alpha & THEY are in control, not you. Don’t be selfish & think of your own wants & needs & ignore what they need. You & they will lose in the end. I don’t have pets simply because I know I don’t have the time or resources to properly care for one. I get my love fix through my son’s well cared for, trained & beloved dog. My neighbors dogs come to my door and bark for me to come out & play, give them love & attention they don’t get at home. My neighbors should not have pets at all. A pet takes almost as much time & care as a child. Do right by them.

  6. Gale Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 7:41 am

    As a certified dog trainer, these attacks show very poor treatment of the dogs who attacked, and the owners should be charged with attempted manslaughter. Any properly treated dog will not attack unless provoked, and far more than what a 3-year old accompanied by his mom and aunt would. The dogs in both attacks were obviously either trained to kill by the owners, or so severely unsocialized and mistreated they reverted to primal instincts, all of which falls back on the owners shoulders. They need to be charged with the most severe offenses allowed to send a message to other assholes who think the same reaction is funny.

  7. RedFlags dog training Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 7:44 am

    I am pitbull specialist and aggressive behaviour Rehabilitation trainer.
    I have 30+ years with over 700 dogs worked with. I believe if your dog can take a human life they are a weapon and should require licences with training. Ear tagging should be implemented immediately, green is good, yellow in training or puppy, red means should be muzzled and on a leash. To many people encounter off leash dogs and have no idea what they are like until to late. Nobody seems to know how to stop or defend themselves in this situation so I will say this;
    Find a rope leash or belt, make a slip knot collar get it around the dogs neck or back legs. Proceed to drag over the offending dog To a fence, or tree.
    If no other rope to do the same to the other dog-grab it’s back legs and pull. Once loose make sure you back up in half circles to keep the dog side stepping to avoid falling on their face, plus they can’t turn around and bite you. Get someone to get a leash.. Go from there

  8. Fernando Noreña Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 7:46 am

    I agree with Karen. I truly believe there are never “bad” dogs, but “bad” owners. I am celebrating in Colombia (where I live) the issuance on Jan 6th of the Animal Cruelty Law (Law 172)that turns it against the owners or people who harm animals, with fines and prison from 1 to 4 years.

    I have known many pities and rotties, and have never met one that was either aggressive or even “rough”. All from loving owners.

  9. RedFlags dog training Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 7:47 am

    I am pitbull specialist and aggressive behaviour Rehabilitation trainer.
    I have 30+ years with over 700 dogs worked with. I believe if your dog can take a human life they are a weapon and should require licences with training. Ear tagging should be implemented immediately, green is good, yellow in training or puppy, red means should be muzzled and on a leash. To many people encounter off leash dogs and have no idea what they are like until to late. Nobody seems to know how to stop or defend themselves in this situation so I will say this;
    Find a rope leash or belt, make a slip knot collar get it around the dogs neck or back legs. Proceed to drag over the offending dog To a fence, or tree.
    If no other rope to do the same to the other dog-grab it’s back legs and pull. Once loose make sure you back up in half circles to keep the dog side stepping to avoid falling on their face, plus they can’t turn around and bite you. Get someone to get a leash.. Go from there
    If dog is attacking you, well.. pending on your age and physical means there are many ways to defend and even attack back. However the most important protect your neck and face as best you can.

  10. Gale Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 7:49 am

    Rotties are the sweetest dogs, and the only problem they have is that they think they are small dogs and want to curl up on your lap. Dobbies are big scary looking dogs developed by a tax collector to scare people into paying, and in 20 years of training dogs, I have never met one anywhere that was mean in any way. Ditto for the bull terrier breeds. You can usually tell if one of these breeds is a problem because it is wearing a pronged collar that matches the one on its owners neck. Asshole dogs are owned by assholes

  11. Patty Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 8:00 am

    We have had a Belgium Shepard, a Doberman, and now two black labs – all of our dogs were socialized, and loved and taught not to jump on people, or kiss them to death. Our Doberman was a sweetheart and she lived to be 12 years old. It depends on how all of these breeds are raised. Many are not socialized and taught to be watchdogs. Dobermans hate to be watch dogs away from people – they are family dogs and ours would follow us but also would protect us, but not viciously. Some people should not own dogs – it is just terrible how some of them are treated. I have known two pitbulls in my life and they were sweet dogs, socialized with children and other dogs. We adopted our Doberman and one of our black labs and they both had issues, being kept in a cellar all the time, and we worked with both of them and all they want is love. So people need to learn how to treat animals the correct way – they are family and I am so tired of hearing “what, it is just a dog.” That makes me sick. What a shame that these dogs had to be shot because a fool did not know how to treat the dogs. They certainly did not deserve it and the owners need to go to jail and not allowed to ever have another pet that they can raise incorrectly.

  12. Kimberly Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 8:31 am

    In my life i have experienced 5 dogs attacks on my dog. 4 of those were pit bulls and each of those owners were shocked that their dog was capable of that! These dogs were socialized and apparently prior to the attack very sweet and compliant – these dogs are simply unpredictable and i have no desire to be near any of them. sorry this is my experience …

  13. Pat Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 8:35 am

    I have a very happy, gentle, lovable King Charles Spaniel, about 25 lbs. I took him to puppy classes because I wanted him to be socialized with other dogs. He is 3 now. He loved going to the dog park to see the other dogs. Unfortunately, we have come across a lot of people with aggressive dogs, who think it’s there dogs right to do what ever it wants. We’ve stopped going to the off leash park because of out of control dogs. In three years we have had 3 really scary encounters. Usually the owners say they are just playing. When my dog is yelping and trying to get away I don’t see that as play. And the owners say nothing to their dogs. One owner told me to pick my dog up whenever I see his dog coming because he doesn’t like small dogs. Another told my husband to just knee his boxer in the chest when he had picked our dog up and the boxer was snapping at my husband. I’ve noticed these same people don’t bother to clean up after their dogs a lot of the time. It’s too bad that these people get to enjoy the off leash park and we don’t, just because our dog is well behaved.

  14. Dianne Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 8:37 am

    This is very sad. I do believe it is the owners fault that these dogs do such things. I do not believe that it was because the owners smoke pot that this happened and find it offensive that this is suggested. Not all people that smoke pot are stupid animal abusers. If your stupid and don’t know how to care for animals that is just the way it is. Maybe before anyone is allowed to own one of these types of dogs they should have to go through some testing and be monitored occasionally to make sure they are treating the animals right by keeping them contained and out of trouble.
    I think that all the hype about pit bulls and such being viscous is why so many people go out and acquire them. They think they can prove everyone wrong about how they are not realizing that this type of dog needs more training and should not be allowed to run free. But then again I don’t feel that any dog should be allowed to run free in areas where there are other people, children, or small pets. This is for their own safety as well as everyone else.

  15. Margaret Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 9:06 am

    I feel for the people hurt in these attacks but I blame the owners not the dogs. I once took in a 3 yr old German Shepherd who the owner wanted to get rid of because the dog bit everyone. When I got the dog he was infected with flea’s and had never been allowed inside a house. i cleaned him up and took him indoors where he was given lots of love and plenty to eat. He was never tied up once I got him. You know I owned that dog for 13 years and wonder of wonder he never bit anyone. Could it be in the difference in how he was treated? I think so. Most and I say most like people some can be pure evil but the majority treated and raised with love are not mean. They act as they are treated.

  16. mary Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 11:26 am

    My household consists of 2 fairly large pit bulls (1 is a 3-yr old rescue), a pug and 3 cats. We also have 4 children and all their visiting friends. Everyone is initially afraid of the pitties due to their 100lb size and the pit reputation, but once they get to know them they see what big babies they are and fall in love.
    On the other hand, our pug is the one with issues. He was over a year old when we witnessed our neighbor children teasing him and throwing things at him. Until then, we didn’t know why he ran from young children and barked like crazy. So now, if we’re at the park or the dog park, he has to stay on leash if there are any children around. He hasn’t bitten, but he gets nervous and growls so we don’t take that chance.
    The point is that you should know your pets as well as you know your children. You will know their fears and their life purposes. With that basic knowledge, you know if they should require containment and/or therapy.
    We ARE responsible AND accountable for every pet in our care.

    (it is also very, very difficult to rehabilitate a dog who has been tormented and has fear and trust issues. I know….and mine, thankfully, is only a little guy)

  17. Margarita Brown Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 12:32 pm

    Hello Dr Andrew and everyone,
    I love dogs but this is not good enough.
    Like guns they can fall into the wrong hands, so it is with these types of dogs.
    For that reason guns and these dogs should have controls.
    There are plenty of breeds, pit bull breeding should be illegal by now, phase them out globally!

  18. Gianni Notti-Fullerton Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 12:43 pm

    As a homeopath I have seen many dogs become biters as a result of rabies vaccination in particular. I’ve treated many dogs and as a result of bites several people specifically for rabies vaccinosis.

  19. Roberta Baxter Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 12:47 pm

    It is the owners fault that dogs go wild! I have had all the breeds mentioned as “:dangerous” and none attacked without cause. My brother in law used to kick my little gentle Chihauhau so she nipped him back. Dogs have only so many resources available to them. When pet owners allow abuse or neglect of animals, I blame the human not the dog for actions like described. Just having Marijuana in the air can GREATLY affect animals too.

  20. Paul Syrett Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 2:43 pm

    Hi Andrew

    I agree it is usually poor owners that lead to poor dog behaviour. But let us look at these breeds. Pit Bulls and other similar breed were bred for fighting, so it is in them. All dogs are dangerous but I would fancy my chances more against a Shi Tzu than say a Pit Bull. The Pit Bulls and similar breed can do a lot of serious damage quickly and are (if you don’t know how) difficult to break off you

  21. Jay Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 7:04 pm

    Having an any animal is a huge responsibility. You must invest in your dog. Good food, medical care and most important training them. It’s good for the dog and everyone who will come in contact with it.

  22. Jana Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 7:23 pm

    I totally agree with the post above by Paul Syrett – pit bulls are bred for fighting and it is in their DNA. You cannot ask a daisy to become a rose, so to speak. Pitbulls are killers, worse than a weapon. Being killed by a weapon one doesn’t suffer as much as being killed by a pit bull and witnessing own death, that is the worse than any torture one can imagine. I do not wish to insult those who are pit bull lovers but I simply will never understand it.

  23. Jo Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 7:52 pm

    While I agree with most of the above remarks re good and bad dogs and dog owners. There is another tack I wold like to take. Namely teaching your children how to be safe around dogs.

    Any dog can become nervous in a threatening situation. No small child should be allowed near an unknown dog. Even a so called good dog can get nervous around toddlers and small preschoolers who can inadvertently trespass inside the dog’s territory. The sort of admonitory nip that a dog will give a puppy to teach it better manners can be traumatic to a tiny child.

    My own dogs have with one exception been sweet tempered but I still kept/ keep them firmly under control if there are children around.

  24. Dana Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 8:35 pm

    I have been attacked once…by a neutered male black Lab. I got myself and female Husky into the car in time to save ourselves, so the snarling foaming beast tried to molest my Ford Explorer. It was quite an event. I have recently seen reports and photos of serious bites from other “sweet” breeds.

    Also, beware of unethical “trainers” who deliberately antagonize dogs in order to try to sue owners huge sums of money for a bite that was actually provoked! I witnessed this and also saw the “trainer” slyly pick at the treated cut on his hand to tty to enlarge and reopen it after it had been cleaned and bandaged. Upon later examination the sneaky little fellow’s training credentials turned out to be fake. Who’s the victim here? The dog is, in my opinion.

  25. Maureen Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 9:59 pm

    I almost always think that we don’t have the full story in these dog attack reports: what kind of interactions had the people and the dogs had previously? What triggered the attack at the time it happened?

  26. Margaret Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 10:58 pm

    Hi Andrew,
    I am always saddened when I hear of dog attacks, especially so when a particular breed is blamed. I’ve owned many dogs, mostly ones that have been abused/neglected in the past and have always found that love and training do wonders in changing them from frightened, anxious (and ‘dangerous’ because of that fear animals into well behaved, well socialized companions.

    However I never allow any of my companions to be around children unless I am actively supervising the event!! Children often don’t realize that their actions can cause pain to an animal and particularly if the animal has been subjected to abuse in the past, the animal often has no other defense than to snap and/or growl. It may well show it’s distress in its body language for quite some time prior to that but unless the person is able to understand those signals, then the dog is left growling and or snapping.

    Some people actually train their dogs to attack by the way they play with them. I know of one man who thought it highly amusing to dress in overalls then engage his dog in ‘attack games’. I often cautioned this man that what he was doing was actually training his dog to attack humans ‘for fun’, but I was treated as a fool by him. Human skin is much thinner than that of a dog, dogs that bite each other can cause severe injuries, biting a human causes even greater injury and often the resultant blood and screams excite the dogs to inflict further injury.

  27. Mardi Hadfield Says:
    January 9th, 2016 at 12:43 am

    I am a blind woman and have had 4 Guide dogs.I am totally amazed that people allow their children to run up to my dogs and pet them. No parent should allow their children to pet or run towards a dog that they do not know.One of my guide dog’s was a Belgian Shepherd and many children and adults always would pet him.My dogs were well trained and treated with love and understanding.None of them ever bit any one. People also don’t realize that when you pet a working guide or service dog, you are distracting that dog from doing it’s job. This could be very dangerous as if my dog is not paying attention to her job,I could be seriously injured or killed while crossing a street.My Belgian Shepherd was also attacked by 7 different pit bulls or pit mixes as well as some small ankle biters. I had to retire him at only 6 years in service, because he became dog aggressive. He never bit or lunged at another dog,he just growled, but I could not take the chance that he might lunge and bite another dog.Loose dogs are a night mare!!!!! So are people who don’t respect a working dog and give it the space it needs to do it’s job. Please people, stop molesting my dog! I don’t touch you or your children,so don;t touch my dog!

  28. Marja Says:
    January 9th, 2016 at 2:22 am

    So sad to read this story.

    Dogs poorly trained, or played with roughly;

    Dogs ignored by owners altogether;

    Dogs deliberately mistreated. Or trained to fight. Because it’s “dope” to be a “thug” with a badass mofo dog “only you can control.” (The ultimate in twisted stupid ideas of machismo)

    Dogs allowed to run loose (pack behavior setting in as a result?);

    Dogs whose owners think a good way to train is to be aggressive with the dog;

    Dogs with arrogant/ inconsiderate /selfish owners (as related by the Cavalier KC Spaniel’s lady;

    COMBINED WITH

    People in the neighborhood who find it fun to torment dogs;

    People (like the victims) just minding their own business;

    People who don’t know how to approach or act around dogs;

    And sadly — little kids in their own fenced in yards who are playing when a crazy mean dog jumpa the fence;

    EQUAL DISASTER.

    We need societal and regulatory controls. Good luck with that.

    Meanwhile we must guard ourselves.

  29. Jacqueline Austin Says:
    January 9th, 2016 at 2:36 am

    I am shocked of course that someone could train a dog to do this, as I don’t see a dog doing it naturally, as they are “Man’s best friend”. However, in England the Pit Bull has been eradicated by the muzzling of such breeds or any that look like them and all must be neutered by law. Thus there are no more of this breed left now. This was enforced due to such attacks on children.
    I have noticed that on the Ceaser Milan’s program, he has several of this breed and similar, which, as much as I enjoy his programs does tend to promote this dangerous breed, primarily bred to fight?
    Jacquie Austin U.K.

  30. Andrea Says:
    January 9th, 2016 at 6:58 am

    Before even doing any research just read carefully. These were two separate articles. The pit bulls entered someone’s trailer home and in another incident in another town the Rottweiler was the one that had been yelled at previously by the sisters. It doesn’t state whether the Rottweiler was their own dog or a neighbouring one they had contact with previously. I agree the drugs were irrelevant but as someone else noted the marijuana in the air can affect the dogs behavior.
    And buying, training to use and have a gun just in case a dog attacks is ridiculous. It’s more deadly to drive your car every day. This is Canada not the USA thankfully.

    Brandon Van Every Says:
    January 8th, 2016 at 7:36 am
    “Officers said they have a good idea who owned the animals but are still trying to figure out why the dogs were loose and what led to the vicious attack.” The victims were not the owners of the dog. At this point without me having done any research, I find comments about the victims taking drugs and yelling at the dogs totally irrelevant. Sounds like vicious dogs roaming the neighborhood and them yelling at the dogs to get them to go away.
    In the USA this kind of problem is solved with a gun, an axe, a stout kitchen knife, and some martial arts training. If you have ever had a big pit bull latched on your own dog’s neck, it will drop your sympathy for such an animal to zero. Kill it quickly in self-defense, no mercy. It’s a pity the victims did not have the skills and equipment to do so. You can’t wait for the police to save you.

  31. Dr. Andrew Jones Says:
    January 9th, 2016 at 8:14 am

    To all of you who commented- Thanks for you very thoughtful suggestions. It’s so nice to hear and be part of an informed, and wise community of concerned pet owners.

    I personally just felt shocked and saddened- it took a while to just let it sink in, and then respond.

    I wish more of the ‘good pet news stories’ were published. In 2016, that will be more of what comes from me.

    Thanks again.

    Dr Andrew

  32. tristtan Says:
    January 9th, 2016 at 10:58 am

    It is unfair to focus on these two incidence of dog aggression. We are in the middle of the sixth extinction (this one caused by humans) and this is what you focus on?
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cmb5hn2X2ok
    This foments hatred against certain breeds and does not focus on the humans who are to blame.

    Dogs as well as many other species of animals are murdered each year in horrific ways and no one cares. Did anyone ever investigate if these dogs were abused? Provoked? of course not because they are just property. As property humans can torture and murder other species with impunity.

    inquisitr.com/1662744/death-of-gizmo-is-the-saddest-case-of-animal-torture-youll-ever-read/

    http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2015/aug/17/dog-found-tortured-to-death-on-central-texas-playg/

  33. Barbara Says:
    January 9th, 2016 at 12:39 pm

    Unless you are a licensed breeder, all dogs and cats should be neutered or spayed. People who wish to own select breeds of dogs that are considered potentially dangerous should be required to purchase a special owners license which includes training by a certified dog trainer on how to properly handle these breeds prior to being able to own one of these breeds. Strict fines should be established and given to any owners of dogs of these breeds that have not neutered or licensed their dog/s according to these laws.

  34. Maye Matias Says:
    January 11th, 2016 at 12:25 am

    ALL dogs, ALL breed for that matter have their own temper. Such temper would only be aggravated with human factor. Irregardless of breed, if dogs are raised with human love and touch, they will most likely grow obedient, loving and loyal. It is so unfair for them to be treated inhumanely if all they can show to their humans is their loyalty and unconditional love. You reap what you sow.

  35. Nicasio Martinez Says:
    January 14th, 2016 at 1:27 pm

    How quickly commenter’s forget the facts.

    “Fort St. John RCMP said they were called to a trailer home in the northeastern B.C. city by a frantic 51-year-old woman who reported two dogs had entered the home, killed her cat and were mauling her and her partner”. & “Officers said they have a good idea who owned the animals but are still trying to figure out why the dogs were loose and what led to the vicious attack”.

    The moment a questionable behavior was mentioned on the part of the victims, it was a spin off the chart of facts that made them at fault, in their own home, and attacked by two ‘lethal known neighborhood beasts’. The owners should be charged and held fully accountable for their dogs behavior. The most factual point in all of this, persons who have no idea about dog training, or have the time or inclination to learn obedience training should not own dogs who can turn to ‘beats’ on the prowl.

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