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New Celebrity Pet

By Dr. Andrew Jones

Tori Spelling has most recently made the news for her and her husband Dean McDermott adopting a micro-mini-piglet, not just into their household, but into their bed as well. Other celebrities including George Clooney, Paris Hilton, Megan Fox, and Elizabeth Hurley have also made piglets their pet of choice.

“We got Hank from a couple that were moving to a place that couldn’t have pets,” Spelling said of the 18-pound, 9-month-old micro mini piglet. It seems like it was meant to be for the couple, as they plan to rescue many other animals one day. “When we finally sell our house we plan to get a farm,” says Spelling. “That’s why we are moving. So yes, many more rescue animals in our future!”

Tori and Dean have other pets, as well as a pet chicken named Coco, so it is fitting that Hank ended up with them! Hank the piglet is comfortable and pampered in the Spelling-McDermott household, spending his time relaxing in their bed….

“Hank is super smart, he learned to use our doggy door within 20 minutes of getting him home. He is curious yet very docile for his age. He gets along really well with all the other animals and totally gets that Coco the chicken rules the roost! No pun intended.” “He’s a total ‘lap pig’ and insists on sleeping on the bed,” she adds. “He’s really pampered and funny!”

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Topics: Pet Care | 11 Comments »

11 Responses to “New Celebrity Pet”


  1. Maria Tereza Murray Says:
    May 31st, 2011 at 6:10 am

    And I know that pigs are one of the most clever among all animals.
    They are cute and it is hard to know that we eat them
    I can´t no moe.

  2. Lynette D Says:
    May 31st, 2011 at 6:50 am

    Great! Will the monkey see-monkey do following commence leaving animals neglected, abandoned and over-bred? Trends like this are never good for the animals involved.

  3. Dana Says:
    May 31st, 2011 at 6:52 am

    Pigs are smarter than dogs…or so it’s said. If I had a farm I would have one of these mini’s, especially if they stay ‘baby’ cute.

  4. Heather Says:
    May 31st, 2011 at 8:19 am

    sorry, another celebrity trend that begets neglect and irresponsibility. I remember when vietnamese pot bellied pigs were quite the trend. What happend? Animals neglected, abused and dumped. Piglets may b cute and may be like dogs but they come with a whole set of responsibilities and needs. while I am all for responsible pet stewardship, Iam appalled that these poor animals are the next big trend. troubling article.

  5. Dr Andrew Says:
    May 31st, 2011 at 8:37 am

    Hello fellow readers, Thanks for the comments. The pig in the picture is very cute- it was hard not to post her.

    That being said, I appreciate the comments on celebrity trends, and responsible pet ownership.

    It once again reminds me of the importance of thinking for yourself, and not just getting a
    ‘new’ pet because of mr or ms famous so and so..

    I am sticking to animals in need- We currently have far too many unwanted dogs and cats in shelters.

    Dr Andrew

  6. Coralie Says:
    May 31st, 2011 at 12:24 pm

    I agree with Dr Andrew, we must remember to adopt animals in shelters and not cultivate a hord of “breeders” trying to sell sweet piglets.

    We can best help factory farm animals by spreading the word about the terrible conditions they are living under and the cruelty they endure.
    No animal should suffer in this way,even if many people are meat eaters, please be aware of what you are buying at your store. Cheap meat supports cruelty to animals Worldwide!

  7. martha Says:
    May 31st, 2011 at 2:47 pm

    been done, long ago….. see “Green Acres”!

  8. Christine Heal Says:
    June 2nd, 2011 at 12:10 pm

    The “micro pigs” do not stay tiny. In fact, there is no such thing as a micro pig, a Juliana pig, teacup pig, etc. They are tiny as babies, and may not be tall as adults, but are stocky and most are well over 100 lbs. There is a large group of pig rescue folk who are trying to educate the public about these pigs. My pot-bellied pigs grew the most AFTER they were a year old. They were phenomenal pets: very, very bright, easy to train, but even more opportunistic than dogs (e.g.: opening cupboards, pushing cushions off the couch to make himself comfy), and other things which makes sense to them but not appreciated by us humans (putting his head in his litterbox and peeing on the floor…). One of my pigs NEVER rooted (dug with his nose); the other did. For people who research pigs and know what they are getting, AND live in a community where pigs are allowed, they can be a great pet.

  9. Jean B Says:
    June 2nd, 2011 at 12:38 pm

    As one who has fostered potbellied pigs and also volunteers with Hearts on Noses minipig sanctuary (a rescue for abandoned, neglected and abused companion pigs), I cringe every time I see a story on ‘micro pigs’ ‘mini pigs’ and now micro-mini pigs!
    I have yet to meet a ‘micro pig’ that was still small at four years old. While some reach their full adult weight at about 60 pounds, many others reach 100 – 150 pounds. And still others die young because of all the health problems that arise from breeders who breed runt to runt, brother to sister, in an attempt to make pigs smaller and smaller.
    The pigs I fostered grew signficantly between their second and third year and again between their third and fourth year. All too many of the pigs who come into rescue started out being sold to an unsuspecting buyer as a ‘mini pig’ or ‘micro pig’ that was supposed to always stay small.
    Just for the record, all pigs that are not farm pigs (who can grow to 1000 pounds) are called minipigs – the customarily have an adult weight of 120-150, though some are smaller and some larger. And MANY municipalities in BC (and probably elsewhere in North America) have bylaws prohibiting any kind of pig, big or small. Again, a lot of pet pigs that come into rescue were sold to people who didn’t know they weren’t allowed – until the bylaw officer came knocking.

  10. Janice Says:
    June 3rd, 2011 at 7:07 am

    I have attached some standard info i send to those inquiring about these not so little guys.

    http://www.youtube.com

    http://www.teacuppig.info

    http://thetruthaboutpetpigs-pigtruths.blogspot.com/2011/04/truth-about-potbellied-pigs.html

    Teacup , Mini pigs, Micro Mini, Royal Dandie, Juliana, Miniature, or a new one i saw now calling a spotted pig a Dalmation pig are just names that sellers use as a marketing tool and are just POT BELLIED PIGS.

  11. Norma Sandler Says:
    September 30th, 2011 at 7:21 am

    Thank you for informing the public about the latest innocent animal trend pigs. I would like to know what happens to these celeb pigs further down the line, say up to 5 or 6 years. Are they still alive, living in the house, kept in the yard alone or a garage as some I have heard about?
    Some are kept by illegals, killed and eaten. Pigs, like any other animals need to be with others of their own kind in a natural invirnment and cared for not for our needs and desires but for their own. Don’t buy while shelter pets die.
    Adopt from a shelter or rescue groups and put breeders out of busness. They are just flesh peddlers who will say anything to make a sale.

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Dr. Andrew Jones, DVM
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