[ Close Bar ]  
FREE BOOK: "Top 10 Ways to Save Money at the Veterinarian":   Email: 
 

« | Home | »

Seizures In Dogs: The 5 Most Important Natural Remedies

By Dr. Andrew Jones

If your dog has epilepsy, then you really should be looking at some of the alternative remedies for treating seizures. Conventional treatment typically consists of 2 veterinary drugs, Phenobarbital and Potassium bromide, which both have numerous side effects. This article will cover the types of seizures in dogs, causes, and the most important natural remedies.

A seizure is defined as abnormal muscle activity, as a result of uncontrolled messages from the brain. There is a sudden, brief change in how your dog’s brain is working. When the brain cells are not working properly, your dog has the physical changes called a seizure.

Dog seizures are classified as either grand mal seizures, or localized. Grand mal seizures affect your dog’s entire body. Generally the legs are extended and paddling and the head is rigid and extended. They may go through cycles of being stiff then relaxed. Some dogs may lose bowel/bladder control, and if the seizure occurs at night, this is all you may see in the morning. Localized seizures affect only certain areas of your dog’s body. Typically you may see their head shake or their jaw chatter.

In the majority of cases the cause of the seizure is unknown, and it is then called epilepsy. Some of the other possible causes include: cancer (i.e. brain tumor), infections, brain trauma, poisoning, low blood sugar, hypothyroidism. Your veterinarian can discuss a variety of diagnostic tests such as blood work, x-rays, CT scan, MRI, Spinal fluid tap.

The age at which the seizure starts will give you a fairly good idea as to the underlying cause. For pets less than 1 year old, most are caused by brain infections (i.e. meningitis); some dogs though will develop epilepsy as puppies. For pets between the ages of 1-5, the most common diagnosis and seizure cause is epilepsy. If your pet has his first seizure over the age of 5, the most common cause is a brain tumor.

There are reports that show a link between diet and seizures in dogs. One human study showed a marked reduction in seizure activity with patients on the Atkins diet. Every seizuring pet should at least try a commercial hypoallergenic diet for 12 weeks. Most alternative practitioners are strongly advising a holistic diet, naturally preserved, free of grains, and primarily animal protein.

There is one acupressure point that can be particularly helpful. GV26 is the most important one, as it can help stop a seizure. It is where the nose meets the upper lip (immediately below the nostrils). This is a key one for CPR, as it can trigger your pet to breathe, and for seizures. Hold the point for 1 minute during a seizure.

Essential Fatty Acids may potentially decrease brain inflammation. Here you want to have high doses and therapeutic levels of the the EFA’s; the dose being 1000mg per 10lbs of body weight daily. That equates to 1 tablespoon of flax oil per 50lbs daily.

There are 2 homeopathic remedies that have been reported to be helpful by some holistic practitioners. Belladona can be given twice daily in addition to the conventional medication; the dose being one 30C tab per 30lbs twice daily. Aconite is useful for sudden conditions ( such as during a seizure), dosing it at one 30C tab per 30lbs every 15 minutes.

Choline is used for certain human nerve disorders; it helps make a nerve chemical called acetylcholine. A specific choline product that can help seizures in dogs is called Cholidin. It can be given with conventional medication, at a dose of 1-2 pills daily for a small dog, and 2-4 pills given daily for a large dog.

You should now have a good understanding of seizures in dogs, and the classification of grand mal or localized. Most causes of seizures are unknown; they are then called epilepsy. If you have a seizuring dog, I encourage you to try some of the holistic options in conjunction with your veterinarian. You may be able to decrease the frequency of the seizures, or lower the amount of conventional medication.

Dr Andrew Jones

Be Sociable, Share!

STAY INFORMED

Sign up here for Free Updates (and get my free e-book "Top 10 Ways to Save Money at the Veterinarian"):

To post a comment, click the 'Comments' link below:

Topics: Dog Care, Dog Health, Pet Care, Pet health | 16 Comments »

16 Responses to “Seizures In Dogs: The 5 Most Important Natural Remedies”


  1. Alecia Cole Says:
    December 6th, 2011 at 6:44 am

    Thank you so much, Dr. Jones!! I love that you are into natural and preventative alternatives to conventional medicines. I believe in these for humans, and I certainly think that our pets deserve at least the same as we humans.

    In owning a pet store, and now a cat and dog rescue, I have come into contact with many people who’s pets have had seizures, but I never had any suggestions or advice for them. Now, I do. Thanks to you.

    I think that the ignorant established veterinary board did you a great disservice in revoking your license. I’m so glad that you took to the internet to offer your knowledge.

    If I may, I’d like to save this article for future reference.

    Thanks again for all that you do!

    Alecia Cole

  2. Alyce Hand Says:
    December 6th, 2011 at 6:50 am

    This article about treating seizures in dogs amazes me and I am only sad that I didnt know these important facts so I could help my baby, Kari. She has left me to be with the Lord but I miss her so much every day. I pray others can see this and learn from it.

    Thanks so ever much for all this information.

    Best regards
    Alyce Hand

  3. Deborah Says:
    December 6th, 2011 at 7:31 am

    Hellio Dr. Jones, I am glad to hear you discuss Seizures, I have a 6lb yorkie name Buttercup whom I love dearly. She was diagnose with a mild case of hydrocephalus, fluid in the brain. She had an MRI. She had been phenobarbital but I had them take her off she could not stand, then she was out on keppra and prednesone. She was taken off the steroids after a year and Just 2 wks ago weened off keppra and she gave been seizure free for 2 yrs. so far no seizures. In 2wks since taken off if all medications and no seizure since on all medications in two years. Buttercup was only about 13 or 14 wks and was having petite mall seizures which then became grand mall seizures she is doing good and I hope and pray that she have outgrown her seizures if that is possible for most of her life I have been administering meds to her 3 times a day. I educated myself and wanted her off all medicines because of sides affects. Thanks to her neurologist buttercup is doing great. I spent a lot of money and I am glad to know it is a holistic way to care for her if she every should have another seizure. She will be three years old this December. I do have flax seed and just may start giving her some daily. I hear it is good for them . Thank you, you alway give good advice. You even mentioned Trupanion is a good insurance which I had switch to before to before reading that you had said they seem to be a good choice.

  4. Mary Emmons Says:
    December 6th, 2011 at 9:28 am

    My bull dog Dozer does a thing we call fly biting. My vet thinks it is a form of seizure, but we are not sure. He has “floaters” in one eye and she also thought that might be the cause. I think that I might try the flax seed to see if that might help solve the problem as some days he does it several times in one day and then he doesn’t do it for a week or so.

    Thanks for all your holistic advice!

  5. Rebecca Wacker Says:
    December 6th, 2011 at 11:30 am

    Dr. Jones,
    I really wish I had access to your information a year earlier, but now I know. Thank you and please never stop giving us what you have. I lost my beloved girl to one of the most horrible ordeals of my life and I pray I never have to go through it again. Not only did she have the seizures, but she started vomiting, it went downhill after that. She died in my arms before I could get to a vet-we live in the mountains almost 2 hours away. Anyway, I have your first aid manual and dvd. It will probably be awhile before my heart is ready for another companion, but I’ll get there.

    Sincerely,
    Rebecca Wacker

  6. Annie Says:
    December 6th, 2011 at 1:49 pm

    Hi,I have a 2 year old jack russell called Benny.We recently moved to the country and this energetic happy dog started having seizures.3 now a horrible thing to witness.But since reading your invaluable advice i have now started giving him daily massages just giving him a nice gentle massage starting at the back legs and working up to around his neck and ears.Don’t know if this is a cure but it seems to help.I hope to never witness another one,i also keep a diary.keep up the good work.Regards Annie…

  7. Sheila Says:
    December 6th, 2011 at 10:33 pm

    What about cats with seizures?

  8. jayne Says:
    December 7th, 2011 at 7:07 am

    What a wonderful, concise and helpful article, Dr. Jones! I learned a lot from it and will keep it as reference material! I’m a bit surprise, though, that you didn’t mention overvaccination as a possible cause of seizures considering that the mercury content of vaccinations can cross the blood-brain barrier and wreak havoc. And then, of course, the 4-5 things that are effective at pulling mercury gently out of the system (my #1 favorite being Waiora Natural Cell Defense and #2 favorite Essiac Tea). You are a fabulous vet, with such a higher understanding and your willingness and ability to educate the masses on things they really need to know is making a huge impact on the world and I appreciate you!

  9. Celia Says:
    December 7th, 2011 at 12:43 pm

    Thank you for a most informative article!
    My husky, Tundra, had his first seizure at age 2. As it didn’t happen often, about 3-4 times per year, he never received any conventional medication. We found an article on the Internet suggesting the use of honey. Since then, we were able to stop the seizures as soon as we saw the first signs. It is absolutely amazing to see him returning to “normal” behaviour immediately. The two times that we were too late with the honey to prevent the seizure, we found that honey given immediately after the seizure, helped him to recover faster. He normally doesn’t want to eat the honey, so I just put it on his foot and he licks it clean.

  10. Linda L. Snyder Says:
    December 9th, 2011 at 2:47 pm

    Thank you Dr. Jones for natural, holistic ways of taking care of our beloved animals. When my yellow Lab Cody had a couple grand mal seizures, the Vet said to get him in within a two hour period so that a blood test could be done to determine the cause. We’re hunting and nowhere near a vet when this happens so I got online and found information that has helped me. The article I read said to give (very specific) Haagen Daaz Vanilla Ice Cream. You can’t do that when you’re out hunting so the next best thing was butter and honey so my husband and I carry organic, unsalted butter mixed with honey in a lock&lock container and before each hunt give him a few licks and during the hunt every hour we give him some and it works. I think his blood sugar gets low because of his working so hard and running so much so I carry dog energy bars and tripe treats with me and supplement with the butter and honey and he hasn’t had any seizures since then. I watch my dog’s body language very carefully and if I see him stumble at all and it’s not because of a hole, we sit down and rest for 30-45 minutes and give him something to eat and drink. I really appreciate all your wonderful information and think it’s a shame that your license was revoked. Anything that’s good, natural, and works seems to get shut down in this system of things.

  11. Karleen Says:
    December 13th, 2011 at 3:08 pm

    Thank you Dr. Jones for this information. My 4yr old lab/pit mix has been having a form of seizure that only involves head bobbing for about a year or 2 now. She was having them almost daily for awhile and then went a few months without any, then recently has had a couple of episodes during the night. She is totally functional otherwise during the “seizure” and an interesting thing I have noticed is that when it happens during the day, if I can distract her with a toy or treat or something, the head bobbing will stop. I don’t know if it is just coincidence or not, but so far it has consistently worked. It is unnerving, though. I wish I knew what was causing this, but I can’t afford a bunch of tests. The possible food correlation is interesting, and could another possible cause of seizures be associated with yearly vaccinations? It has been engrained into us in the past to vaccinate yearly, and now there is so much info against doing that because of the possible long term effects.

  12. Sam Strecker Says:
    December 19th, 2011 at 10:36 pm

    If I had known then what I know now, my 7 year old Blue Heeler cattle dog Sarah would still be alive. She had regular, intense grand mal seizures as a result of head trauma. A neighbour who had a huge dislike for dogs threw a rock at her head. Hard to believe, isn’t it? We were spending $90 Aud per month on medication that simply didn’t work. Sarah had lost most of her cognitive ability, she was confused, disoriented and generally suffering a poor quality of life. Thanks for the vital information. It may just save another person from the heartache of losing a beloved pet.

  13. Diane Stangeland Says:
    January 18th, 2012 at 7:55 pm

    Thank you for all the articles.

  14. jocelyn pascual inocencio Says:
    September 2nd, 2012 at 7:19 am

    thanks doc, now i knew it is epilepsy,. my 2 yr old female lab is having seizure twice since she gave birth to 7 pups.she was sick when her pups were 1 month old. our vets here in our place don’t have enough facility/equipments for dogs/cats.my heart breaks when she is sick coz our vet cannot diagnose her illness.the seizure usually take 10 minutes and after that she’ll be ok.

  15. Debbie Says:
    September 24th, 2015 at 7:44 pm

    I rescued Yorkies for years and saw all the damage that vaccines cause. It was very common for shelter dogs to have seizures, allergies, auto-immune diseases, gastrointestinal issues, organ failure 4-8 weeks after getting the combo vaccines, rabies vaccine and the rest of the poisons that shelters give every animal. We must educate people and work to stop all that’s done wrong. It’s harming and killing our animals and children. Thank you for all the great information you share!

  16. Brenda Says:
    May 24th, 2017 at 6:48 pm

    quick question- how can you press and hold for a minute the GV26 acup point on the dog s nose during a seizure and stay safe ?

Comments



Dr. Andrew Jones, DVM
Help your pet and learn how to save money at the Veterinarian today
Get my Free eBook and Newsletter:

Dr. Andrew Jones' Top 10 Ways to Save Money at the Veterinarian
Enter your email and click the button below - and quickly learn simple ways to heal your pets at home and save money today:


I hate spam as much as you do - your information is 100% safe and will NOT be shared with anyone else. You can unsubscribe from my newsletter at any time.
[Close Box]