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What To Do If Your Dog Or Cat Is Choking

By Dr. Andrew Jones

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Topics: Cat Health, Dog Health, Pet health | 4 Comments »

4 Responses to “What To Do If Your Dog Or Cat Is Choking”


  1. Rick Brown Says:
    December 20th, 2013 at 12:50 pm

    Jesse deserves an Oscar for his performance in this video…at least a second treat. Thanks for this video. I have been a dog owner all my life and this is something that has always worried me about what to do in this case. Every time this has happened so far, the dog has dislodged it themselves. I now feel more confident on how to handle a situation like this. Thanks.

  2. Donna Says:
    December 21st, 2013 at 12:19 am

    Great video Dr Jones and Jessie. I disagree with the doctor when he said Jessie was moderately compliant. I think he was very helpful!

    I hate seeing dogs playing with tennis balls and wish their human parents would get them those big Kong type of toys that are impossible to swallow. Sigh…

  3. Jo Says:
    December 23rd, 2013 at 10:35 am

    Helpful video and Jessie was amazing!

    I was once told that if there is a ball lodged in a dog’s throat, rather than sweeping with the index finger which might push it further in, you can try pushing from the outside of the neck underneath the ball toward the mouth opening to get it to pop out. Not sure if that actually works…

  4. Suzi Says:
    January 5th, 2014 at 8:45 am

    Yes Jo, that does work!
    A little over 4 years ago, my Golden was choking on a ball I’d tossed down to her from a high deck. Even though I couldn’t see her, nor she see me, it was a great game since she always seemed to catch it.
    As this particular ball went through the air though, I had a funny feeling that its size and texture(like a handball)might be dangerous. Her other balls were out in the yard, yet to be retrieved and I was busy gathering gardening tools.
    I heard the “thwock” of her catching it and then, NOTHING…no dog tags jingling as usual when she’d race around and up the steps to return the ball to me, wanting me to “Throw it again, throw it AGAIN!”
    I ran down to the below the deck and found her silently struggling. I tried a modified version of the Heimlich numerous times and in my panicked state thought we’d both be found dead in the yard. My heart trip-hammered with fear and desperation.
    She lost consciousness and as a last ditch effort to save her, I placed my hand gently on her throat below the ball and pushed up. I removed it as soon as I could get a grasp on its slippery surface. As I was about to give her mouth to snout, she drew in a heaving breath and within a few seconds was ready to play again!
    I disposed of that particular ball and she had to wait quite a while as I tried to get my own breathing and heart rate back to normal.
    So anyway yes, it worked for me and my Golden but probably because it was a smooth rubber ball that slid easily.

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Dr. Andrew Jones, DVM
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